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Does Social Media affect sexual desire in women?


Photo credit: Elijah O'Donnell

It’s quite an interesting question to investigate because the last thing that we can think of that could actually affect the sex drive in women is the Social Media. Usually when it comes to the low libido we refer to more serious psychological or physical problems such as deep emotional trauma, hormone imbalance, disconnection with the partner, overwhelming with work, study or children. Among other very common reasons to cause low sexual desire is the body image, specifically is how confident woman is in her own skin. Is she always ready to take her clothes off  and immerse herself in passionate sex with her partner or she is extremely self-conscious and always not happy with her body? In order for women to engage in the sexual act she needs not only feel relaxed, safe and desired but also feel sexy. This internal feeling of enjoying and admiring her own body is crucial for many women when it comes to sex, because woman is getting pleasure from seeing her own beauty and how much her partner loves and worships her. It’s a major turn on for women and one of the most important conditions for an orgasm. Probably in a world of men this will sound ridiculous but every woman knows exactly what I’m talking about. Female orgasm is directly connected to the woman’s brain. And if she is constantly thinking about whether he sees her extra pounds on the back or how heavy she is to be picked up, she can never relax hence never orgasm…

In order for women to engage in the sexual act she needs not only feel relaxed, safe and desired but also feel sexy.

In this post we are  going to discuss poor body image - sexual desire connection and what Social Media has to do with it?

It’s very well known fact that Instagram and Facebook are overloaded  now with images of “perfect” women who live in the “perfect” houses, married to “perfect” man, dressed in “perfect” designer's wear and overall enjoying their “perfect” life. Sometimes it’s even difficult to distinguish one woman from another because it seems like an epidemic of “the Perfection” taking over the Instagram making them all look alike. Overall it’s a model type of body, shiny hair, flawless skin, flawless face, nails, long legs and of course on top of it the DD bra size. The comparison is unavoidable.

According to sociocultural models of body image and disordered eating, body dissatisfaction can develop when women repeatedly compare their own appearance to the appearance of others (Keery, van den Berg, & Thompson, 2004; van den Berg, Thompson, Obremski-Brandon, & Coovert, 2002; Vartanian & Dey, 2013). Indeed, research shows that women regularly evaluate their appearance by comparing themselves to others (Leahey, Crowther, & Mickelson, 2007), and that a greater tendency to engage in appearance comparisons is associated with a high level of body dissatisfaction (Keery et al., 2004; Myers & Crowther, 2009; van den Berg, Thompson, Obremski-Brandon, & Coovert, 2002; Vartanian & Dey, 2013).

For women in particular, just 10 minutes of ruminating on others’ images on social media can have them spiraling into self-loathing moods.

Given that young women are now turning to Internet sources rather than print media (Bell & Dittmar, 2011; Tiggemann & Miller, 2010), and given that people are able to be more selective with the content viewed online, it is also important to examine the effect that this medium is having on women’s body image. In addition to its impact on body dissatisfaction, exposure to thin-ideal media (e.g.,magazines, IG, Facebook) also leads to more negative mood (Harper & Tiggemann, 2008; Tiggemann & McGill, 2004).

One analysis found a link between depression and rumination- the practice of mulling over online experiences, even long after we’ve logged off. For women in particular, just 10 minutes of ruminating on others’ images on social media can have them spiraling into self-loathing moods. Of course, self-deflating confidence and depression can take a toll on partnered sex.

The feeling of “not enough” makes women to isolate or create distance with their partner to reduce discomfort. So instead of seeking real intimacy, women start to seek social media likes, which will make them feel good for a moment or completely isolate and linger in the self-dissatisfaction leading to the versatile forms of depression. Of course in this case scenario, the very last thing that depressed woman would want is sex..

There can be multiple solutions to this problem arising predominantly nowaday among young women including teenage girls. We can’t not forbid women to go on social media or stop them from posting “perfect” selfies. The "Me, Me, Me" movement has started a while ago and only getting worse. But what self-conscious women can do is to disconnect from the constant mainstream visual enforcement, self-reflect and just know who they are. In the end of  the day we all know that majority of “perfect” selfies are heavily processed and noone is actually perfect, unless we make them so in our mind...


Sources:

Social comparisons on social media: The impact of Facebook on young women’s body image concerns and mood Jasmine Fardoulya,∗, Phillippa C. Diedrichs b, Lenny R. Vartaniana, Emma Halliwell.

www.elsevier.com/locate/bodyimage


#womensinitiative #sexdriveinwomen #relationship #intimacy #love #sex #whywomendontinitiatesex #femalesexuality #libido #sexandsociety #menandwomen #socialmediandsexdrive #socialmediaandwomen

Disclaimer: The content material is only informative and academic in nature and shouldn’t be construed as medical recommendation.



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